August 21, 2008

Boys and Books

Tricia over at The Miss Rumphius Effect had a couple of posts earlier in the week I wanted to highlight. First up, Boys and the Bard getting into that always fun and controversial subject of whether it's more important to get kids, especially boys reading and loving it, or reading certain kinds of books. She quotes a Guardian article on the subject and highlights this excellent question:

Why do we still confuse the need for literacy with the experience of reading, and even more important to some, loving a canon?

Well? What do you think?

I think you know where I stand.

Next up, her post More on Boys and Reading. She quotes a press release that is a definite eye-catcher:

"If reading were an Olympic sport, it would be the women holding all the gold medals and world records - not the men. In fact, the women are not just passing their male counterparts when it comes to reading, they are lapping them around the track."

Hmmm.


4 comments:

S said...

My son begs me to read to him but he doesn't like reading on his own. I wish I had started reading to him when he was much younger. I've always loved to read but I fell out of the habit when I was working. I feel confident that he will one day love to read on his own. I also try to encourage my husband to read and to let the kids see him reading. It's working :)

Teacherninja said...

It does work! I highly reccomend Jim Trelese's Read-Aloud Handbook or Mem Fox's Reading Magic for more ideas. But baically? Never stop reading out loud to them until tthey leave the house. Thanks, jim.

Nancy said...

Fortunately, I LOVE reading out loud - I get to totally indulge my inner actress. And Anthony knows it's the one thing I'll always do with him if he asks, no matter (almost) what else I'm doing at the time. I've read to him since he was born, he's five, and I have no plans to ever stop. He likes to be read to, and he likes the feeling of accomplishment he gets from reading words on his own. He's not reading as early I was, but I think when he's ready, he'll be a good reader. I definitely encourage him to pick out whatever he wants, regardless of what I think of it.

Tracy said...

Or perhaps reading has been too narrowly defined.

See 'Reading Don't Fix no Chevys' and 'Going with the Flow'.

http://books.heinemann.com/products/0509.aspx