April 15, 2010

Books and eBooks

Going Paperless: Not as Green as You May Think from GreenBiz

Some Thoughts About E-Reading from the NYT

eBooks in Libraries from Wanderings makes Jacquie Henry think we need to get ebooks into libraries fast, but it just makes me remember how badly we teach history and how boring most of those textbooks are.  I don't think they'd be much improved or comprehension would increase just by migrating the same crap onto an e-reader.  I fail to see how--if the book did all the things these students were joking about--their understanding of the content would increase.  Feel free to enlighten me!

The #101-120 Best Children's Novels (as chosen by Fuse #8 readers) and the "Whaddaya MEAN it's not on the list" list

9 comments:

Nancy said...

Have you read Phillip Pullman's "The Good Man Jesus And The Scoundrel Christ"? I'm pretty sure you would like it. The iTunes e-version that comes with the synched audio book is amazing.

Jacquie said...

When I wrote my ebook post - I was thinking mostly in terms of non-fiction books, not text books. I have a library full of great non-fiction that our kids ignore for the most part. If our non-fiction books were in ebook format, and as easy to use as a web site - they might have a chance with the net generation. If they were in ebook format and searchable via the computer, I wouldn't have a student coming the the desk saying - "you don't have any books on "Albrecht Durer". We actually DO have MANY books with lengthy chapters on Albrecht, which is what this student really needed. What if the catalog could have led that student to the books and allowed him to look at the various chapters and then decide which one of our many books about Renaissance artists he wanted to take out? That would be great.

As for novels...I have a lot of avid readers and they want no part of ebooks. However, I also have several friends with Kindles who love it, and now tend to avoid print books. To each his own. I've tried both and still prefer a real book. That said, I need to really know where my kids are if I am going to provide them with resources they will USE.

As for textbooks - they are just plain boring. Not sure if ebooks can help with that. The content is the same - whether read in ebook or print form. Still - maybe some clickable pictures that would bring up a video, along with a "read to" feature might help the net gen or struggling readers trudge through the material with a little less pain.
:-)

I am looking forward to reviewing the sources you list. I will add them to my collection on "The Future of Reading" at http://wanderings.edublogs.org/internet-literacy/

Jim (Teacherninja) said...

Nancy,

It does sound interesting. He's such a great writer. Thanks!

Jacquie,

Wow. Thanks for such a considered response. I'm learning a lot about this from you and from those links on Doug Johnson's Eating Crow post. Lots to think about. Hope you don't mind if I work in some of these quotes in a future post.

-Jim

Jacquie said...

Hi again! Glad to share. I am nearing the end of my career (Something I do NOT look forward to). Since you are beginning your library career, perhaps you might be interested in pursuing the issues I raise in the post below. I have yet to find cataloging software that can do what I describe. The major companies don't seem to be the least bit interested. But - if books are to remain viable, this is what we need. I am hoping someone with the power and the vision will create this "Net Gen Library Catalog".
Catalog Companies – Can You Hear Me Now?

Jacquie said...

Whoops! I forgot. Please feel free to quote any of my ramblings on your blog.

Nancy said...

Anthony is now reading his first ebook on his grandma's Kindle. He's very excited about it, and has eschewed the tv and computer games all morning. It's fun, he says, because it's a new experience.

Jim (Teacherninja) said...

Nancy,

What's he reading on the Kindle?

Nancy said...

"Fairy Tales All Children Should Know."

In paper format, he's reading Ramona The Pest right now - remember that one? It's better than Junie B. Jones, and we love Junie B.!

Jim (Teacherninja) said...

Ramona is way better than Junie! I had a friend who wrote a story about an adult Ramona who has her identity stolen by one "June Jones."